Geothermal areas in Krísuvík volcano (videos)

Send to Kindle

Text is from youtube video!

Madly bubbling and spectacularly bad smelling hot spring area near Krisuvik, about an hour’s drive South of Reykjavik in IcelandText is from Google Video!

Fúlipollur í Krísuvík – The name literally means foul puddle.

Text is from youtube video!

( video 2002, Iceland). The geothermal area Krýsuvík is situated on the Reykjanes peninsula in Iceland. It is in the south of Reykjanes in the middle of the fissure zone on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which traverses Iceland diagonally from the south-west to the north-east of the island.

Krýsuvík is one of Iceland’s high temperature areas. This becomes visible through the sulphur springs and hot springs at Seltún and another similar area nearby.

At Seltún, one finds by now some explanations to the phenomena to see, a wooden show path and hiking trails leading up the mountain Sveifluháls behind.

KrýsuvíkThe biggest lake in the area, Kleifarvatn, began to diminish after a big earthquake in 2000; 20% of its surface has since disappeared.

Some of the minor lakes show also the influence of volcanism, so for example Grænavatn with its luminous green colour.

In this area, there had been some farms till the 19th century. But they had to be given up. Only a small chapel, Krísuvíkurkirkja built in 1857, remains and can be visited.

This entry was posted in Krýsuvík, Video, Volcano. Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Geothermal areas in Krísuvík volcano (videos)

  1. Martin Fischer says:

    Back in 2003 I visited the Seltún geothermal area. Itwas very impressive.
    Walking over the bubbling water and through the water vapor, the only sound coming from the mud pools (really next to the street).
    And I remember clearly that the sign “danger hot springs” is sufficient in Iceland. Anywhere else you’d have to build a big fence.

  2. And a nice quake at Herdubreid:
    Thursday
    02.12.2010 08:14:14 65.092 -16.440 2.0 km 3.1 99.0 2.6 km WNW of Herðubreiðartögl

  3. Henk Weijerstrass says:

    We visited Krýsuvík back in 1997 & 1998. In these years there was a chimney like bore hole which exploded (if I’m right) in 1999. This was a very impressive sight for us!
    We visited again in 2009 and if something happens there (as we have read in the blog a few days ago), we will visit this area again.
    A big problem is our Vitara which has failed an MOT test (sills completely gone).
    So we are looking now for a Land Rover Defender. We love Iceland and want to visit again in 2011!

  4. Bromo says:

    Wow, spectacular! :D
    Does this mud have medicinal properties?

  5. Sigrún says:

    Here’s some info: “Iceland has many famous hot springs, including the one feeding the Blue Lagoon spa in Grindavík, Iceland, and Europe’s highest flow rate hot spring Deildartunguhver. Deildartunguhver’s water emerges at 97 °C (207 °F) and is piped many miles to heat neighboring towns.”

    “Therapeutic uses:
    Because heated water can hold more dissolved solids, warm and especially hot springs also often have a very high mineral content, containing everything from simple calcium to lithium, and even radium. Because of both the folklore and the claimed medical value some of these springs have, they are often popular tourist destinations, and locations for rehabilitation clinics for those with disabilities.”

  6. Sigga says:

    Vil benda á að Krísuvíkurkirkja brann rétt eftir síðustu áramót.

  7. Henk Weijerstrass says:

    Dear Sigga,

    The Icelandic language is not my strongest point; you said something about Krísuvík?

    Kind regards,

    Henk3ome

Comments are closed.